T2201 Guide Version 4 Released

Form T2201 is the linchpin for The Disability Tax Credit (DTC). I cannot begin to describe how important this form is to our families.  Unfortunately some new political realities are making it more difficult for families to apply.

A successful filing of the form T2201 will set your family up to apply for:

  • The Disability Tax Credit
  • The Child Disability Benefit
  • The Home Buyers Amount
  • Additional qualifying medical expenses
  • Home Accessibility Tax Credit and
  • Most importantly, the Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP)

It appears that the rejection rate is on the rise.  We have all seen the news stories of families being rejected for the DTC, even if they have previously qualified. At first I thought this was simply a few families who did not fully complete their forms, but it looks like it going well beyond that.

Does This Mean You Shouldn’t Apply?

No!

It does mean that you need to be even more careful about how the form is completed and how your case is presented.

As one of my favorite bloggers (Big Canjun Man at the Canadian Personal Finance Blog) likes to point out; “If you don’t apply, you will never get the Disability Tax Credit”.

The updated T2201 Guide is available for download here. There is some additional guidance how far back the disability can be back dated as well as how to deal with the changing political climate. I strongly recommend that you read the document completely before sending it to the government.  It is so much easier to deal with issues now rather than following a rejection.

Navigating services for your child with Autism is like juggling shape-shifting porcupines.  It's not easy, and you encounter a lot of pricks.

 

Milburn’s Excellent Guide to Back Dating Disability Credits

So what are we talking about here?

Most of the federal tax credits that I describe on my website are based on the foundation of eligibility of the Disability Tax Credit (DTC). This is granted by the government after a successful filing of the T2201 form.

I will warn you that this is a long post.  If you are not interested in getting a substantial amount of money from the government, please stop reading now! On the other hand if you are like most humans and you like money, read on and I will provide you with some simple solutions.

Many people are unaware that the tax credits in question begin not on the day the DTC is granted, but rather the effective date, which may be many years in the past or ideally birth. Of course, as readers of my website, you obviously consulted my T2201 guide and ensured that birth was the effective date of the disability.  You did read the guide…right? If you were unaware of this, you can certainly re-apply for the DTC with updated information using the form T2201.

Once the DTC eligibility is in hand, many of the tax credits can be back dated to the effective date of the disability, but in most cases, you have to ask for it.

So, one by one, here are some of the tax credits that you can have back dated.  Please don’t dismiss this as too hard.  The process is very easy and can add up to a substantial amount of money. You can do it with only a couple of hours work and the payout can in some cases be worth tens of thousands of dollars of after tax money. Hey, I would love to get a job that pays $5,000 per hour.  Wouldn’t you?

The Disability Tax Credit

This is the only tax credit which can be back dated automatically on request.  The new T2201 form has an election (in other words…tick the box) to have the government automatically calculate the amount for you.  Why it is an election is beyond me.  Why wouldn’t someone want the the government to send them a pile of money?  The DTC is presently worth about $2,300. Multiply that by the years owing and that could turn into a lot of coin.

The Child Disability Benefit

Once you qualify for the DTC, the government will automatically calculate a back dated amount for the current and two previous tax years.  Prior to those years, you will have to make a request. To make this request is dead simple.  Write a letter to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) and ask that they back date this benefit to the effective date of the DTC.  It’s just that simple!

At over $2,700 per year for a low income household, this tax free benefit can add up dramatically.

Medical Expenses

All those years of tutoring or therapy can now be claimed.  Use the T1-ADJ form to make the request.  It’s a simple one page form with no calculations required. Make sure you include receipts and invoices to back this up. Refer to https://asdfunding.com/medical-expenses/ for more information.

Attendant Care Expenses

A sub-section of Medical Expenses which may include hiring a nanny for your child. Refer to https://asdfunding.com/medical-expenses/ for more information.

Fitness and Arts Tax Credit

Even though the federal government has phased out it’s program, you can still claim expenses from years past using the T1-ADJ form.  Remember that for each year of DTC eligibility, the government will add $500 to the total just because you have a disabled child. Receipts are required if you have not already submitted them. Refer to https://asdfunding.com/other-tax-credits/ for more information.

Child Care Expenses

You did hang on to your receipts from years past, right?  If so, you can now claim up to $10,000 per child eligible for the DTC. Again the T1-ADJ form is the one to use. Refer to https://asdfunding.com/childcare/ for more information.

Canada Caregiver Amount

The Canada Caregiver Amount (which now incorporates the Family Caregiver Amount) can be back dated to 2012 (the inception of the credit) or the effective date of the DTC, whichever is later.  No receipts are required and again the T1-ADJ form is used. Refer to https://asdfunding.com/other-tax-credits/ for more information.

Home Buyers Amount

Normally this is for first time home buyers, but if you purchased a home for the benefit of someone who qualifies for the DTC, then you may be eligible for this $5,000 tax credit. The purchase must be made to allow this person to live in a home that is more accessible or better suited to their needs. Once again, use the T1-ADJ form. Refer to https://asdfunding.com/other-tax-credits/ for more information

Home Accessibility Tax Credit

If you had home renovations in 2016 for the benefit of someone who qualifies for the DTC, you may claim up to $10,000 of expenses.  Refer to this post for more information.  Once again use the T1-ADJ.

Receipts

Receipts must be supplied to back up your claims for the following credits/deductions:

  • Medical Expenses
  • Attendant Care Expenses
  • Fitness Tax Credit
  • Arts Tax Credit
  • Home Accessibility Tax Credit
  • Home Buyers Amount
  • Child Care Expenses

Normally when filing a tax return, you would not include receipts, but rather hold on to them in case CRA asks for them.  In this case as you are filing for past credits, you must include them in your letter.  Make sure that they are broken down by year and category.  It should go without saying, but if you don’t have the receipts, don’t claim the credit.

Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP)

OK, so this is a little bit different than the tax credits referred to above, but no less valuable. The RDSP grants and bonds from the government (read that as free money) can be back dated to the effective date of the DTC.  All you have to do, is open the RDSP.  The Disability Savings Bond (up to $1,000 per year) will automatically be back dated. To receive back dated Government Saving Grants, you will have to make appropriate contributions to the account.

That sounds like way too much work!

I agree! Two hours of work to receive thousands or even tens of thousands of dollars is completely unreasonable. Fortunately, Milburn has created an easier solution for you!

It turns out that you don’t actually have to use the form T1-ADJ.  You can just write a letter instead.  Too much work still?  No problem! I have created a template letter in docx format that you can download here and send to the CRA.  You’re welcome!

Anything Else?

For God’s sake don’t pay anyone to do this for you.  So called “Disability Agencies” will charge you an exorbitant amount to do what you can easily do yourself.  Don’t even call them for a quote, unless you enjoy being harassed to use their services.

What next?

Once you have completed all of the above, there are three very important steps that you must do:

  1. Firstly, congratulate yourself for being so clever.
  2. Secondly, go out and celebrate your good fortune.
  3. Thirdly, post your experience on whatever parent message board you are using.  Let other parents know how valuable this is and encourage them to do the same.

Bill C-462 – Dead on Arrival

Tweet For those of you unaware Bill C-462 the Disability Tax Credit Promoters Restrictions Act ,was passed into law and received Royal Assent (2014-05-29) . Limits are needed for DTC Consultation Firms (link to CBC article on the act) This Disability Tax Credit Promoters Restrictions Act summary This enactment restricts the amount of fees that can…

via Bill C-462 : Protecting Disabled Canadians or a Paper Tiger ? — Canadian Personal Finance Blog

The New Disability Tax Credit Certificate

Last year Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) held consultations across the country regarding the Disability Tax Credit (DTC) program. The welcome changes involve a simplified Disability Tax Credit Certificate Form T2201 and the method of claiming adjustments to the Disability Amount for previous years.

Some highlights include:

  • The form is reduced from 12 pages to 6
  • Detailed instructions are now moved to the Form RC4064 – Disability Related Information
  • Added a new section to allow for adjustment for previous tax years
  • Added more space for “Effects of Impairments”
  • Added a gentle hint for each mandatory section by labeling it “Mandatory
  • Shortened some sections for clarity
  • For each type of impairment, CRA has added who may certify that section

All these changes are most welcome and will simplify the process for new applicants. The basic premise of DTC application has not changed and advice from other parents who have completed the process remains largely intact.

My detailed T2201 Guide has now been amended. I strongly recommend that you download and read this guide prior to making your initial application.

Tax Changes for 2015

There are a few minor tax changes for the 2015 tax year that parents with ASD kids need to be aware of. Some of the changes are cosmetic and others may have a more substantial impact on your family finances.

Some of the changes include:

  • The Family Caregiver Amount for children under the age of 18, is now claimed on line 367 of your tax return. This tax credit is $2,093 for 2015.
  • The Fitness Tax Credit used to be a non-refundable tax credit, but starting with the 2015 tax year becomes a refundable tax credit. In essence, this means your tax payable for the year can be reduced below zero. Unlike previous years, you may now claim up to $1,000 and if your child is eligible for the Disability Tax Credit (DTC) and provided you spend at least $100, you may add an additional $500 to the total. If you are using tax software (highly recommended), it will automatically add the $500 as long as it knows your child qualifies for the DTC.
  • The Child Tax Credit (this is the base tax credit for all children) has been replaced with an enhanced Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB) which gives a new benefit of $720 per year for children ages 6 to 17. It’s important to note that this is taxable, so be ready for a tax bill (or a decreased tax refund).
  • For those of you with disabled teenagers, a gentle reminder that you should file tax returns on their behalf starting for the year that they turn 17 (and every year thereafter). This is vitally important for their Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP) grants and bonds when they turn 19. The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) considers the amount of income 2 years prior to the current tax year to calculate government contributions.
  • The Disability Tax Credit for 2015 is $7,899 and the disability supplement for persons under the age of 18 is $4,607. As in previous years, the supplement may be reduced if someone claimed Child Care or Attendant Care expenses. I strongly suggest that you use tax software for this calculation.
  • There are some changes to the T2201 Disability Tax Credit Certificate and how to claim for previous years. I will be expanding on this subject next week.

Time to Re-apply for the Disability Tax Credit Certificate

Let me preface this post with a thank you to Milburn Drysdale at ASDFunding.com (or Autism Funding in BC for Dummies) his documentation is what we based most of this work on, and if anyone asks you, they should check out his site before you read anything over here about Registered Disability Savings Plans for Disability Tax Credits. I’d…

Source: Time to Re-apply for the Disability Tax Credit Certificate

New Medical Expense Tax Category

A new medical expense category for the 2014 tax year is the “Personalized Therapy Plan”. In a nutshell this is what you can use to claim expenses paid to your Behaviour Consultant (BC).

In years past, I recommended that you tailor invoices for your Behaviour Interventionists (BIs) and call the service rendered as “tutoring”. This advice still holds true, but for your BCs (who always write their own invoices) you can now file your medical expenses using this new category.

There are a few conditions to claim expenses as a “Personalized Therapy Plan”:

  • The plan has to be designed for someone who is eligible for the disability tax credit
  • The payment is made to someone who is in the business of providing such services to unrelated persons
  • The therapy has to be prescribed and supervised (in the case of a mental impairment) by a medical doctor or a psychologist
  • The plan has to be needed to access public funding for a specialized therapy (as in BC Autism Funding )